On this day 10 years ago, December 16, 2010, the king of Fuji music, Alhaji Sikiru Ayinde Barrister, passed on at the St. Mary’s hospital in London at the age of 62, to the dismay of many music lovers in Nigeria. Music is something that brings people of different backgrounds and beliefs together and there is no doubt that the late king of Fuji did this with his craft. The Nigerian entertainment industry is one that has evolved greatly and just a few genres of music are quite popular and appreciated. One of such genres is Fuji music. Sikiru Ololade Ayinde Balogun, better known by his stage name, Sikiru Ayinde Barrister, was quite popular for creating the Fuji and Were genre of music.

The legendary singer was said to have started doing music at a young age as an ajiwere singer during the month of Ramadan but later joined the army. However, after a while, he left the army and became a fulltime musician and even later started a big band called the Supreme Fuji Commanders.

Barrister also started out performing with his band to Muslim clients in Ebutte Meta in Lagos but his Fuji style of music later evolved and became accepted by all music lovers in the country, regardless of their religion. The Fuji musician had a number of albums under his belt including Fuji Garbage, Iwa, Nigeria, to name a few. When the news of his death hit the airwaves in 2010, a number of fans were thrown into mourning but they also celebrated the lifetime and achievements of the Fuji music pioneer.

According to reports, his burial ceremony was like a carnival with a number of notable personalities and other Fuji artistes in attendance. Some of them include Ebenezer Obey, Wasiu Ayinde Marshal (Kwam 1), Obesere, Pasuma, Salawa Abeni, Saheed Osupa, to name a few. It was also said that the Fuji maestro was buried in the sitting room of his home in Isolo, Lagos.

Even though a number of new generation kids might have trouble remembering the late Fuji legend, his son who goes by the name Barry Jhay, has kept his memory alive by also going into the music industry. To remember his father 10 years after his death, the Aiye crooner, penned down a touching note on social media explaining how life had not been the same without him. Barry described the late Barrister as his spiritual friend and mini-god. He even went ahead to share fond childhood memories with his father and how he used to touch his head and rub his belly.

See his post below:

Top Fuji musician, Wasiu Ayinde Marshall, Kwam 1, also eulogised the late Fuji music creator and recounted his promise to the late star to always keep the music alive. He prayed for God to forgive Barrister’s sins and grant him heaven.

See the post below:

Barrister might have been gone for 10 years, but his music and protégés have kept his memory alive. RIP to the king of Fuji music.

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